Category Criteria

Kingdom Arts & Sciences Faire Criteria for Individual Categories

Individual categories are in boldface type.

Applied Arts

Amber, Bone and Horn
This category includes work with carving and inlay techniques using natural materials other than wood, metal, and stone.

Guidelines:

  • All aspects of processes and methods used, including tools, should be documented.
  • Use of powered tools is acceptable only for the roughest, earliest stages of the project. Finer areas such as detail work should be done by hand.
  • Entrants are strongly encouraged to use period tools and methods for as much of the entry as possible.
  • Realistic substitutes for ivory may be used, due to the expense and the possible legal issues connected with procuring real ivory, realistic substitutes such as tagua nut and other modern materials that can be manipulated like ivory may be used without a deduction taken for authenticity.

Ceramics and Pottery
This category includes vessels, trinkets, figurines, cookware, and other items made from fired clay.

Guidelines:

  • Decoration must be appropriate for time period, culture, and piece.
  • The use of food-safe glazes is required. If you create your own glazes, please be aware of
  • federal guidelines for any item that could be used to contain food.
  • Commercial glazes are acceptable and should simulate period glazes as closely as possible.
  • Molded ceramic ware is acceptable if the use of molds is documented and the shape is appropriate for the time period. Display of the mold used to create the piece is highly encouraged.
  • Use genuine clay. Air-dry clay and polymer clay (“Sculpey”) are not acceptable in this category, but could be suitable for the SCA Life category (See the SCA Life category for more details).
  • Poured and slip-cast ceramics are not currently documentable to period, but might be acceptable in the SCA Life category (See the SCA Life category for more details).
  • Pieces that are unfired are considered unfinished. Likewise, if a piece was glazed in period, it is not considered finished until it is glazed.

Glass Work
This category encompasses techniques that are involved in the design, cutting, painting, and assembly of stained glass. This category also includes, but is not limited to: Blown glass, Curved glass, Glass beads, and Etching.

Guidelines:

  • Documentation should include specific description of colors and pigments used correct for the period of the piece. Please remember that the color palette increases in later periods.
  • Document the subject selection and the design elements of the piece as correct for the chosen period of the piece.

Additional Guidelines for Stained glass:

  • Document the subject selection and the design elements of the piece as correct for the chosen period of the piece.
  • Include information on all aspects of the project including glass selection, painting, firing, and assembly and soldering techniques.
  • Document proper use of non-lead supports in the case of larger pieces.

Additional Guidelines for Blown Glass:

  • Include information on all aspects of the project including glass selection and glass blowing technologies available for the period of the piece
  • Include information on all aspects of the project including glass selection and etching techniques.

Leatherwork
This category includes the crafting and construction of leather items (e.g., leather bottle or vessel, decorated leather box, etc.) and their decoration using various leatherworking techniques such as cuir bouilli (boiled leather), shaping, tooling, etc. This category includes leather armor and weapons. (Note: Weapons and armor that are composed of leather AND other materials can also be entered under the Miscellaneous category, but the guidelines that apply to leatherwork should still be considered. Likewise, these guidelines apply to leather items such as shoes, belts, gloves, sheaths, etc., which may also be entered as Clothing Accessories.)

Guidelines:

  • All leather construction should be done by hand.
    Glue should not be a primary construction medium. If it is used at all, it should be cleaned sufficiently so that it is unseen.
    Synthetic sinew that appears realistic is acceptable, but synthetic leather is not.
  • Documentation should support the techniques used.
  • Be cautious when using modern commercial stamps; ensure that they correspond to the period of the piece and document their use accordingly.
  • If you use leaf, we strongly encourage the use of real gold or silver leaf.
  • Decoration, tooling, and coloration should be executed and documented to the style, culture, and period of the piece.
  • Ensure all stamping, carving, and other decorative techniques correspond to pre-seventeenth century techniques and materials appropriate to the period of the piece.
  • A reasonable substitution of modern pigments, dyestuffs, and finishes is acceptable. These substitutions should be justified in the documentation and should match the appearance and effect of period materials as closely as possible. Use of period materials will yield a higher score for complexity. Use of toxic period inks/pigments is allowed, provided that the entrant makes a note in the documentation that toxic materials were used.
  • Edges and stitching should be finished in an appropriate manner, which is recorded in the documentation. The use of commercial waxed linen thread is acceptable

Metalwork
Both functional and ornamental metalwork produced by forging, casting, and other forms of hot or cold fabrication are included in this category, as well as metal weapons and metal armor. (Note: Weapons and armor that are composed of metal AND other materials can also be entered in the Miscellaneous category, but the guidelines that apply to metal would still be in effect, particularly where safety is an issue). Decorative metalwork such as engraving (non-printmaking), and metal jewelry are also included in this category.

Guidelines:

  • Documentation of a utilitarian piece should discuss the elements of the piece and the rationale for them, as well as the precedents and reasoning behind its design and function.
  • There is substantial scholarly argument as to the possible use of electroplating in the ancient world and, if the entrant shows awareness of the arguments, such use should be counted as authentic.
  • Molds made in the course of construction of an entry should be described in the documentation, and if possible, be exhibited with the entry.
  • The entrant is encouraged to submit any drawings or plans used to create the submission, as well as photographs, drawings, or books relied upon in the design.
  • No points will be deducted for modern precious metal plating. This is to discourage use of period techniques in any mercury (metal) amalgam gilding, which is extremely hazardous to health and environment and too dangerous to use without specialized knowledge and equipment.
  • No points should be deducted for the use of modern exotic steels because of hazards similar to mercury gilding during smelting steel, however a knowledge of period materials should be shown in the documentation.
  • If using other hazardous materials, follow appropriate safety precautions.

Warning: Mercury gilding as practiced by the ancients is extremely dangerous. Such techniques may not be used in the ancient manner. Modern safeguards for mercury gilding are required and must be mentioned in the documentation. Use of modern safeguards will not be a cause for a lower authenticity score. OSHA LEVEL 4 containment hood as a minimum safety precaution is recommended.

Additional Guidelines for Armor and Maille:

  • It is the armoring skill that is being judged in the category, not the weight of the entry.
  • Non-armor uses of mail are not eligible.
  • Modeling the entry is preferred. Entries can be modeled in one of three ways: on the body; on a stand or dummy; or via photographs from all angles. If photographs are used, the photos must show the entry worn on the body or on a stand/dummy.

Additional Guidelines for Knives, Swords and Weaponry:

  • Blades are not required to be sharpened and points will neither be withheld nor awarded for sharpness.
  • Devices using gunpowder are not eligible for entry.

Woodwork
This category includes constructed pieces, furniture, musical instruments, and treen (useful objects carved of wood, such as spoons or combs). Wooden weapons also fit into this category. (Note: Weapons and armor that are composed of wood AND other materials can also be entered under the Miscellaneous category, but the guidelines that apply to woodwork should still be considered.)

Guidelines:

  • Appropriate substitutes for period woods are acceptable. For example, if a hardwood like English oak was used in period, it may be hard to find locally. In this case, an American variety of oak with similar characteristics to the English oak may be substituted.
  • No factory pre-finished wood.
  • Document the process and tools used at each stage.
  • Hardware should be appropriate and period.
  • Finishes should be period or a reasonable substitute.
  • Pictures of period exemplars are encouraged.
  • Ornament should be appropriate to the time and place of the item.
  • Modern materials such as plywood and MDF are strongly discouraged.
  • Document all joinery to period.

Domestic Arts

Animal Sciences and Horticulture
A large range of entries fall within this category, from feeding songbirds in their local environment, to coursing greyhounds, to falconry or hawking, to the training of a warhorse. Horticulture includes period gardens and gardening techniques.

Guidelines for Animal Science:

  • Documentation should address the historical aspects of the species. Species and breeds should be as appropriate as possible, given the climate and conditions available to the entrant.
  • Use of authentic breeds is encouraged; however, a reasonable substitution is acceptable if the breed or species looks and feels authentic to the time period and culture.
  • Training and treatment of animals should be done in a safe and humane manner. Period techniques, where illegal or deemed inhumane by modern standards, should be documented but not applied to the entry.
  • Photographic documentation of the entry, including an on-going record of development of the animal is strongly encouraged.

Guidelines for Horticulture:

  • Photographic documentation of non-transportable entries including an on-going record of the development of a garden is acceptable. Every aspect of the garden should be addressed in the documentation, including the non-plant components of the garden such as benches, fountains and ground dressings (ie. mulch).
  • Document the layout and plan for the garden.
  • The garden should be period in as far as is possible for the area. Appropriate substitutes for plants are acceptable, but should be explained (i.e. period plant variety no longer available, European variety unsuitable for this climate.)
  • Modern substitutions for period labor are acceptable, but document the process.
  • Recreation of period garden techniques such as grafting and pleaching are acceptable entries. Include photographic documentation of process.
  • Cut flower arrangements are acceptable in this category.

Brewing
This category includes alcohol-based items where the entrant creates a fermented beverage using grains – beers, ales, meads, stouts, porters, etc. (For wine, see Vintning; for cordials, see Apothecary and Still Room Arts

Guidelines:

  • Entrants and judges in this category must be 21 years of age with proof of age (ID).
  • Entries without recipes and ingredient lists will not be judged.
  • Any herbs and spices used in the entry must be listed in the documentation, preferably with their Latin botanical names.
  • Sanitary methods of preparation and preservation should be strictly adhered to even though they are not period.
  • One bottle per entry.
  • Each bottle should be labeled with the name of the type of alcohol and brief description of the entry.
  • Suggested (not required) materials to aid in the judging of your entry: several small tasting glasses with at least one being a clear glass, small pieces of white bread or unsalted crackers, an unobtrusive container for the disposal of excess liquids, and an opener if the beverage is not already opened for the judges.
  • Taste everything before you enter it.

Vintning
This category includes alcohol-based items where the entrant creates a fermented beverage based on fruits, flowers and/or honey.

Guidelines:

  • Entrants and judges in this category must be 21 years of age with proof of age (ID).
  • Entries without recipes and ingredient lists will not be judged.
  • Any herbs and spices used in the entry must be listed in the documentation, preferably with their Latin botanical names.
  • Sanitary methods of preparation and preservation should be strictly adhered to, even though they are not period.
  • One bottle per entry.
  • Each bottle should be labeled with the name of the type and brief description of the entry.
  • Suggested (not required) materials to aid in the judging of your entry: several small tasting glasses with at least one being a clear glass, small pieces of white bread or unsalted crackers, an unobtrusive container for the disposal of excess liquids, and an opener if beverage is not already opened for the judges.
  • Taste everything before you enter it.

Cooking
This category includes entrees, breads, desserts, subtleties, and cooking aids such as spice blends and condiments.

Guidelines:

  • Entries without recipes and ingredient lists will not be judged.
  • Any herbs and spices used in the entry must be listed in the documentation, preferably with their Latin botanical names.
  • Documentation must include both the final redacted recipe and the original period recipe, if available. (Ingredient substitutions should be explained—too expensive, unavailable, unsafe to eat.)
  • If no exact period recipes are available, use period sources to show the existence of the dish. Explain you conclusions.
  • Keep individual ingredients and techniques consistent as to the appropriate time, place, and culture.
  • Document your process; explaining how the dish was prepared. Process pictures are strongly encouraged.
  • Items containing raw eggs, seafood, or nuts must be labeled clearly and appropriate safety precautions must be taken.
  • Original recipes should be based upon documented medieval sources, techniques, and ingredients.
  • Cooked entries should be fully cooked. Food should be served at the appropriate temperature: hot foods hot, cold foods cold. It is the responsibility of the entrant to see to this.
  • Highly acidic foods should not be cooked or served in reactive cookware.
  • Do not use Sure-Jel or other artificial pectins in period jellies.
  • Any edible flowers used should be organically grown – no pesticides.
  • Taste everything before it is served.

Apothecary and Still Room Arts
This category includes candles, soaps, cosmetics, toiletries, infused vinegars and oils, medicinal cordials, and specialty beverages.

Guidelines:

  • All entries should provide an ingredient list. Provide botanical, as well as common names for herbs and spices. If redacting a period recipe, provide a copy of the recipe and cite the source, along with your redaction. Note any substitutions and tell why the substitution was made. Entries without recipes and ingredient lists will not be judged.
  • The use of non-period liquors in cordials is strongly discouraged. Documentation should follow the cooking category guidelines.
  • Entrant must be at least 21 years of age to enter cordials.
  • Suggested (not required) materials to aid in the judging of edible entries: several small tasting glasses with at least one being a clear glass, small pieces of white bread or unsalted crackers, an unobtrusive container for the disposal of excess food and liquids, and an opener if beverage is not already opened for the judges.
  • Taste everything involved in an edible entry before you serve it.

Fine and Graphic Arts

Fine Arts

This category includes painting on canvas, wood, and decorative items, and sculpture, both in-the-round and relief sculpture. Examples include: portraits, landscape and still life paintings, triptychs, icons, reliquaries, preliminary drawings in silverpoint, statues, relief or bas relief carvings, and some items of jewelry.

Guidelines:

  • The paint and the painting surface should be compatible with each other. (Ex: oil can be used on both wood panel and canvas. Egg tempera can be used on wood, but is not suited to a canvas surface.
  • Both the paint and the painting surface should be appropriate to the time, culture, and purpose of the item you are creating, and should be used in combinations that are historically correct. For example, a 13th century Western European altarpiece would likely be egg tempera on wood panel, but not oil paint on wood, as oil painting in art was not used in Western Europe until the 15th century.
  • Use pigments that are appropriate to the time, place, culture, and socio-economic status of the work. Not every pigment was available and affordable in all times and in all places in period. (As in all categories, reasonable substitutions are allowed, with an explanation of those substitutions.)
  • Use of toxic period inks/pigments is allowed, provided that the entrant makes a note in the documentation that toxic materials were used.
  • Explain any modern substitutions for both paints and for panels or surfaces, listing what would have been used in period.
  • Choices of form and design in framing and painting should reflect aesthetics and designs appropriate to the time period and culture of the piece. Sculpture and 3-D (jewelry) work style and form should also be reflective of the period, culture and socio-economic purpose as presented within the documentation.
  • When creating a religious or spiritual work of art, make sure that all symbols and/or decorative motifs are explained in the documentation, and are appropriate to the entry. Symbolism was important in period, and many seemingly ordinary things we see in period paintings may have had special significance in the context of their time and culture. Use reasoned judgement when choosing to recreate some historical motifs. Some symbols commonly used in period may be offensive to the modern public.
  • Sculpture and 3-D (jewelry) work style and form should also be reflective of the period, culture and socio-economic purpose as presented within the documentation.

Calligraphy
This category includes fine handwriting done with quill, pen, brush, or reed, appropriate to the style of calligraphy, on paper or other writing surface. An entry containing both illumination and calligraphy may be entered in both categories and will rate a higher complexity score in both categories.

Guidelines:

  • All pieces should be protected. A piece in a folio with a cover sheet is easiest to judge.
  • Entry should be free of dirt and smudges. All errors should be corrected and clean, and the method used to correct the error should be included in the documentation for the entry.
  • Use archival materials (i.e. acid free, ph neutral art paper, etc.) whenever possible when period materials are not available.
  • Pergamenata is an acceptable parchment/vellum substitute, with no deduction taken for authenticity. Using real parchment or vellum will increase complexity score.
  • Document paper type to weight and composition.
  • Document color by pigment name.
  • Do not use markers or acrylics.
  • Use of toxic period inks/pigments is allowed, provided that the entrant makes a note in the documentation that toxic materials were used.
  • Commercial ink is acceptable as long as it is not a separate entry. The ink should mimic period inks.
  • For calligraphy, use of a dip pen, quill, or reed, instead of a cartridge pen is preferred. However, novices may wish to use a cartridge pen.
  • If metal leaf is used, real gold or silver leaf is strongly encouraged.
  • Scale should be appropriate to the piece. Miniatures should be done in miniature. Calligraphy and illumination should be properly proportioned to each other.
  • Calligraphic styles should be consistent to time period and culture.
  • Speedball calligraphy books are not acceptable as documentation. Use period manuscripts.
  • An exemplar of the alphabet used to help establish a rhythm and flow to the work should be included in the documentation

Illumination
This category includes decorations and/or illustrations as done in pre-17th century manuscripts. Examples include full pages or miniatures, border designs, drolleries, historiated initials, gilding, line work (i.e. flourishes), etc. An entry containing both illumination and calligraphy may be entered in both categories and will rate a higher complexity score in both categories.

Guidelines:

  • All pieces should be protected. A piece in a folio with a cover sheet is easiest to judge.
  • Entry should be free of dirt and smudges. All errors should be corrected and clean, and the method used to correct the error should be included in the documentation for the entry.
  • Use archival materials, i.e. acid free, ph neutral art paper, whenever possible when period materials are not available.
  • Pergamenata is an acceptable parchment/vellum substitute, with no deduction taken for authenticity. Using real parchment or vellum will increase complexity score.
  • Document paper type to weight and composition.
  • Document color by pigment name.
  • Do not use markers or acrylics.
  • Use of toxic period inks/pigments is allowed, provided that the entrant makes a note in the documentation that toxic materials were used.
  • Commercial ink is acceptable as long as it is not a separate entry. The ink should mimic period inks.
  • For calligraphy, use of a dip pen, quill, or reed instead of a cartridge pen is preferred. However, novices may wish to use a cartridge pen.
  • If metal leaf is used, the use of real gold or silver leaf is strongly encouraged.
  • Use period manuscripts as sources for your documentation.
  • Scale should be appropriate to the piece. Miniatures should be done in miniature. Calligraphy and illumination should be properly proportioned to each other.
  • With very few exceptions, work on paper or skin is considered Illumination, while work on a panel or canvas is considered a Fine Art (Note: see the Fine Art Category for more details).

Printing Sciences
This category includes block printing on paper or cloth, as well as etching, engraving, and printing done using moveable type.

Guidelines:

  • Wood is preferred as the period material for block printing. Use species of wood appropriate to period/culture when available and affordable.
  • Linoleum blocks are acceptable, with deduction taken for authenticity. Wood blocks will get a higher complexity score due to the inherent difficulty inherent in carving the block.
  • The paper or fabric used to pull the print should be appropriate to the type of print and to time period/culture.
  • When printing on fabric, is included in this category and enough fabric should be decorated to establish the repeat.
  • Commercial ink is acceptable, as long as it mimics period inks and colors. The complexity score may be increased by making your own ink.
  • Document whether the print is hand-pulled or done with a press.

Book Arts
This category includes bookbinding (codex, scroll, and wax tablet.) and papermaking.

Guidelines:

  • All leather construction should be done by hand, if leather is involved.
  • If metal leaf is used, real gold or silver leaf is strongly encouraged.
  • Use archival materials, i.e. acid free, ph neutral art paper, whenever possible when period materials are not available.
  • Pergamenata is an acceptable parchment/vellum substitute, with no deduction taken for authenticity. Using real parchment or vellum will increase complexity score.

Tools and Colorants
This category encompasses the creation of all types of coloring agents (mineral, animal, and plant), as well as the tools used to apply them. This category includes paints inks, dyes, and food coloring, as well as pens, brushes, and other tools.

Guidelines:

  • As this category is very process oriented, special care should be taken to document and, when possible, to photograph each step in the creation of the entry.
  • If using a period recipe, provide the original recipe and its source, along with your redaction, explaining any changes or substitutions made to the original. If no period recipe is available, explain your choices based on available information in period, as well as modern sources.
  • Colorant entries should include a sampler of the colors created. Pigments mixed to produce paint can also be displayed as paint chips. Leather dye can be displayed on small samples of leather. Fiber dyes can be displayed using small skeins. Food colorants may be displayed on a surface such as sugar plate. Ink can be used in a pen to create a calligraphy exemplar.
  • If entrant has created and used period colorants as part of an entry in another category, and wishes to enter the colorant separately, color samples should still be provided so that the judges don’t have to find the item in the other category in order to judge the colorant.
  • Entry of toxic period paints and inks is allowed provided the entrant contains the substance in a durable, airtight container and makes a note on the container warning judges of what is inside, and a note in the documentation that toxic materials were used.
  • Pen and brush entries should be set up so that the judges can try the entry for themselves, with paper and ink or brush on hand. Don’t forget water for rinsing and paper towels in case of a spill.

Textile Arts

Construction
This category includes techniques that are involved in the construction of fabric, including, but not limited to: spinning, weaving, sprang, knitting, naalbinding, felting, etc. If a textile entry has been dyed using period materials and techniques, the entrant may also document the dye portion as a separate entry (with dye samples) for the Tools and Colorants category, or else let the dye component of the entry count towards Complexity

Guidelines:

  • Documentation should include specific description of construction such as a warping diagram or knitting pattern.
  • Include information on all aspects of project including fibers, dyes, fiber prep, and tools used as well as the final product.
  • Documentation should be drawn from as a narrow geographic location and time frame as possible.
  • Workmanship and construction, including: tension, evenness of selvedges/edges/ spinning, structure of weave, etc., should be appropriate to material used in the finished piece.
  • Fiber, pattern, size, etc., should be appropriate to the finished piece.
  • The longer the length of the woven piece, the greater the complexity.
  • Entries that have been dyed with period dyes may score higher in Complexity.

Application
This category includes embroidery, lace making, fabric decoration, and beadwork. (Printed fabric falls under Printing Sciences.)

Guidelines:

  • Use authentic materials or reasonable modern approximations.
  • Use appropriate types of wood, metal, glass, etc. where required.
  • Color, pattern, and motif should be documented.
  • If patterns or templates are used, the entrant must include the source of the patterns or templates in the documentation.

Clothing—Single Item
This category is for individual items of clothing judged off the body and emphasis is on the technical skill of the entry. This category encompasses both European and Non-European clothes. Emphasis will be placed on how the garment is constructed.

Guidelines:

  • Use authentic materials or reasonable modern approximations.
  • All visible stitching should be done by hand. Novices using a sewing machine are still encouraged to enter this category – scores will be affected by amount of handwork on the garment.
  • Pictures are quite valuable in the documentation; include photos of exemplars.
  • If the entry is a garment for which there is no primary documentation, explain in detail your choice of methods and materials, based on available information.
  • Avoid mundane closures. Do not use zippers or metal grommets.
  • Include documentation for pattern and cut, where available.
  • Period appropriate fabrics, thread and tools should be used with reasonable and appropriate substitutions explained within the documentation.
  • Trim should be appropriate for type.

Clothing Review (On the body)
This category is for entire ensembles judged on the body. The ‘body’ may be a person other than the entrant. For instance, an entrant may make clothing for their child and have the child model the clothing. How the clothing fits is critical in this category. Emphasis will be placed on how the garments are constructed. If the costume you are entering contains multiple layers, please be prepared to have subsequent layers seen by judges. Judges are limited by modesty restraints on how extensively interior seams may be examined. It is not required that the entrant make everything for the ensemble but the number of items made may add to the complexity of the entry. However, the overall look (from shoes to headwear) is critical for this category.

Guidelines:

  • Use authentic materials or reasonable modern approximations.
  • All visible stitching should be done by hand. Novices using a sewing machine are still encouraged to enter this category – scores will be affected by amount of handwork on the garment. Hand stitching affects the finished drape and construction.
  • If it impacts the silhouette of the garment, period undergarments are required. Mundane foundation garments may distract from the fit or may show.
  • Pictures are quite valuable in the documentation; include photos of exemplars.
  • If the entry is a garment for which there is no primary documentation, explain in detail your choice of methods and materials, based on available information.
  • Avoid modern closures.
  • Include documentation for pattern and cut, where available.
  • Accessories, hairstyle, and makeup should be appropriate to the garment.
  • Trim should be appropriate for type.
  • With rare exceptions, the costume model should be the person the garment was made for, since Kingdom A&S judging is done on the body. The garment should fit the model correctly.

Clothing Accessories
This category includes one or more accessories made to accompany a particular costume, such as shoes, hats, headgear, gloves, bags, belts, scabbards, etc. The emphasis in this category is placed upon how well the accessories work with the costume they were designed to accompany as well as how well the accessories work with each other. (If this is made to complement a complete ensemble, please include that in the documentation. Please provide pictures of how the item integrates into ensemble.) The cost or lack of availability of some materials (such as gold thread, very fine wool, etc.) should be considered in the judging of entries. Special Note: some items may fit better in other categories, i.e. leather shoes in the Leather Work category.

Guidelines:

  • Use authentic materials or reasonable modern approximations.
  • Use appropriate types of wood, metal, leather, etc. where required
  • Color, pattern, and motif should be documented.
  • Document how the accessory was used or worn during the stated time period.
  • If patterns or templates are used, the entrant must specify the source of the patterns or templates within their documentation.

Writing

Creative writing

This category includes fiction such as poetry, prose, plays, and the like. It also includes non-fiction such as history, biography, philosophical instructional treatises, bestiaries, or travelogues written in a period style and musical composition that is not performed.

Special note: An entry in this category must be submitted to the KMoAS no less than four weeks prior to the Faire. The documentation and the entry should be submitted in two separate attached documents and be clearly labeled. It is strongly encouraged that the entrant submit work in a PDF format.

Guidelines:

  • An entry must include one typed (no calligraphy) copy of the entire paper.
  • All entries should use Times New Roman font and 12-point type with one-inch margins and page numbers for the body of the text.
  • Entries in foreign languages must be accompanied by an English translation. (Old and Middle English count as foreign languages.)
  • Entries in languages not normally written in the Latin alphabet, such as Japanese, Arabic, or Greek, must be transliterated into Latin letters with a pronunciation guide AND must be accompanied by an English translation.
  • Documentation of the overall work must include information on structure, theme, subjects, and their interrelationships. It is encouraged that documentation also contain support for major and minor aspects of the work, show evidence that the writer knows the characteristics of period style and content, and give indication of the creative process.
  • Any evidence of plagiarism will disqualify an entry.
  • Length Limit: 30 double-spaced typed pages, not including illustrations and a title page.

Special note: An entry in this category must be submitted to the KMoAS no less than 4 weeks prior to the Faire, if it is lengthy and/or written in a foreign language or in a form that does not use letters of the Latin alphabet.


Scholarly Writing (Research papers)
This category includes all types of scholarly works including research papers, how-to papers, and historical reviews. Papers will be judged on the ease and clarity of writing, along with how well the point gets across to the reader. Grammatical errors WILL be counted against the entry, as they interfere with reader comprehension and detract from the paper as a whole.

Guidelines:

  • Seek to educate, be clear, and be concise in your writings. It is strongly encouraged that the entrant submit work in a PDF format.
  • An entry must include one typed copy of the entire paper.
  • Sources must be cited adequately and properly.
  • No particular writing style is required, but the style used should be consistent throughout the paper. Examples of writing styles, citations, and bibliography styles are Chicago/Turabian, APA, MLA, etc.
  • All entries should use Times New Roman font and 12-point type with one-inch margins and page numbers for the body of the text.
  • Footnotes and/or endnotes are strongly suggested where appropriate.
  • Proofread the paper thoroughly before entering. Having it read by a friend for content and clarity is also encouraged.
  • Length Limit: 30 double-spaced typed pages, not including illustrations, title page, bibliography, and any appendices.
  • Any paper having more than one author must be entered by all the people involved in its writing.
  • Any evidence of plagiarism will disqualify an entry.

Other Categories

Heraldic Arts
This category is for the period use of heraldry. Any medium associated with heraldry in period is acceptable as long as heraldry is an integral part. (Note: For displays of heraldry on non-period items or using a non-period medium, see the SCA Life category.)

Guidelines:

  • Documentation is required on construction, style, and materials used for your entry.
  • If a personal device/badge is used, the blazon and date of registration is a required part of your documentation.
  • The materials, variety of techniques, scope, and size will affect the entry’s level of complexity, and thus the score.

Historical Technology

This category is for experimental technology projects seeking to answer a question about a period object or technique and ‘How Things Work’. To this end, the emphasis here is on the research and thought processes of the entrant and the finished product. A successful entry will have thorough documentation of the process from start to finish, but doesn’t necessarily have to be successful to be a good entry.  Scientific Method applied to the Arts

Guidelines:

  • The entry’s chief purpose must be to research and/or answer a question. Examples: What is the best shell-to-clay ratio for period Anglo-Saxon pottery? What was Greek Fire? What was it made of and used?
  • Additional guidelines can be found under the entry’s appropriate category (or categories).
    Example: If the entry involves clothing, the Clothing category guidelines will be applicable.
  • Finished pieces that result from the experiments can be entered in another category.
  • Pictures that document the process are strongly encouraged.
  • Well-constructed scale models of larger projects are acceptable and encouraged.

Performing Arts

Performing Arts covers any kind of performance, including dance, music, storytelling, poetry performance, and theatrical works. In Performing Arts, the artisan is judged on both the performance itself and its authenticity. Props such as garb, puppets, instruments, etc., may be entered in the appropriate Static Arts Category. Group Performing Arts entries may count towards champion points for an individual. The individual shall receive the same score as the group. Entries in this category should be performed in front of an audience. Issues that are beyond the control of the entrant (bad acoustics of event site, uneven flooring, modern background, etc) will not be counted against the entrant’s performance

Special Note: For all Performing Arts categories, the performances are limited to 15 minutes, including introduction. Entrants will be allowed time to set up props and/or sets for performances. This time will not be counted in their 15 minute total. Set-up and break down should be done as quickly as possible.

European Dance: includes all types of individual and group performances of a European Dance. The performance will be judged on practice and ease of performance, the number of errors and/or recovery from errors, the complexity of the piece and/or steps, and how well the performance style of your piece matches that laid out in your documentation (period aesthetic).

Guidelines:

  • Include the original period choreography for the dance and your translation, if applicable.
  • If the entry is an original dance, include in your documentation supporting period examples.
  • If there are any applicable step descriptions, include both the original period description and the entrant’s interpretation thereof.
  • Include information on period performance style for your entry.
  • Live music is NOT required.
  • Costuming appropriate to the period and culture of the dance is strongly encouraged.

Non-European Dance: includes dance performances from cultures that had documentable contact with pre-1600 Western Europe. Source material for documentation on Non-European Dance is quite limited. Leniency is recommended if it is evident that a sincere attempt has been made to document the entry.

Guidelines:

  • Include the original period choreography for the dance and a translation, if applicable.
  • If the entry is an original dance, include in the documentation supporting period examples.
  • If there are any applicable step descriptions or illustrations, include both the original period description and the entrant’s interpretation thereof.
  • Include information on period performance styles.
  • Live music is NOT required.
  • Costuming appropriate to the period and culture of the dance is strongly encouraged.

Performance: Entries can be individual or group performances. Performance includes:

  • Theatrical works such as those that might be performed on a stage or as part of a pageant or traveling show.
  • Oratory, dramatic readings, and story telling
  • Mime, improvisation, juggling, tumbling, and other entertainments typical of street performers, jongleurs, or court fooles.

Guidelines:

  • The documentation for theatrical works must include the script, score, or a plot summary for mime or improvisation performances, and it is suggested that the documentation also include a discussion of theme communication, blocking, prop use, and line reading.
  • The documentation should give evidence of the knowledge of the relationship between the playwright, actor, and audience in period.

Music: includes all musical performances, either solo or ensemble. The judging of an entry will be based on adherence to score (unless improvisation is a noted ornamentation), the number of errors, and adherence to the noted performance, enunciation, correct tone, and correct tempo.

Guidelines:

  • Vocal performances may be either accompanied by another instrument(s) or a cappella. (The instrumental accompaniment will not be scored, except as it directly impacts the vocal performance. Use of a non-period instrument, such as a modern guitar, does not count against the entrant.)
  • Music may be period or original (by the entrant or another person).
  • If the entry is an original composition, please include in your documentation supporting period examples.
  • Original score must be included in the documentation.
  • Documentation should include notes on the performance practice relevant to the time and culture of the entry.
  • Pre-1600 European music may be used in this category as well as that from Non-European cultures that had documentable contact with Western Europe prior to 1600 c.e.
  • Alternate (appropriate) forms of notation are accepted for Non-European music.

Miscellaneous
Any item that cannot fit into another category will be placed here. Examples of entries that would fit into the Miscellaneous Category:

  • Armor that is made of metal, leather and other materials
  • A 15th century doll created from various materials
  • A composite bow

Guidelines:

Refer to the General Guidelines, plus any other category or categories which might be relevant to the item.


Categories that are not part of scoring for Champion of the Arts

SCA Life
Entries in the SCA Life Category do not receive a score and are not eligible for Champion consideration. A winner in this category may be chosen by Populace Acclaim.

This category is for items of a truly anachronistic nature! They have been created for one of two reasons, the first of which is to disguise a modern necessity so it appears to be period. Examples of what would fall into this first category would be: ice cooler covers, baby stroller “barding”, gas or electric lights, camp chair covers, etc. The other type is inventive in nature; these items were created because the SCA needed them. SCA-legal armor would be an excellent example of the latter type of entry. So would SCA regalia such as baronial crowns, thrones, chains of estate and the like made of non-period materials or with non-period methods. Period materials are not required, period technique is not required, but a period look IS required. A good entry should visually blend into the atmosphere of the SCA and/or enhance life in the SCA.

Guidelines:

  • Substitution of non-period materials or processes alone is not justification for entering an item in SCA Life. If the item and its application existed in period, it should be entered in the correct category. For example, a leather coronet would be an SCA Life entry but a metal coronet made of brass and steel rather than gold and silver belongs in Metalwork. Likewise, a wooden chest would belong in woodworking, but an ice chest with a wooden cover would fit in SCA Life. Similarly, a sword made of glass would fit here. If in doubt, please consult the KMoAS or the person in charge of the competition.

Youth Open
Any item or activity by a youth under the age of sixteen can be entered in this category. Use a loose approximation of the guidelines of the category in which the entry would normally fit. A reasonable attempt at documentation is expected. It is recommended that entrants in this category use the Documentation Made Easy worksheet available on the Kingdom’s website.

Guidelines:

  • All persons entering this division must be 16 years of age or younger.
  • Judging of entries will be done using the appropriate categories’ criteria, with a Youth judging sheet.
  • There will be no numerical scores given within this category.
  • Parents should be present as per Corpora’s age guidelines or with a designated adult.
  • At Their discretion, the Crown or Their representative may recognize exceptional entries.

Demonstrating a Period Activity (DAPA)

NOTE: This is currently a trial category that may be added into the Kingdom category list for Arts and Science competitions. It is being developed for entries that do not have a viable “product” as in Static entries, as well as entries that are not a Performing Art. It is a demonstration of one’s research of the Process without a Product. While originally developed for period combat training techniques, it could include other entries such as period ceremony re-creations, how things were taught, etc.

  • Entrant should strive to make the presentation as authentic as possible, from setting to costume to interactions.
  • It is recommended that any introduction be done in character.
  • Entrants should consider making a tableau based on period images.

Time allowance: Up to 20 minutes for demonstration. Additional Time allowed at end for questions from judges. Does not include set up. Total time: 30 minutes.